One of us is a nerd. The other is a geek. We like stuff.

This game looks so cool, play it on an NES or play it on a computer or play it on both!!! Plus, get a guide for making your own NES game. So cool.

Video:

Super Mario, played on 16 floppy drives.

Get the instructions from n1cod3mus here… because you know you want to.

Video:

They turned a bus stop into a video game and photo booth! 

Video:

Attilio Mineo was an early electronic musician dating back before Moog synthesizers had even really entered the scene. He made these remarkable sounds of space, combining composition and alien-sounding effects, for the 1962 Seattle worlds fair.

Photo:

explore-blog:


The mouse, with its ability to click on specific parts of a document, was the device that made hypertext possible. Without hypertext, there would be no links, and without links, no web. 

The first computer mouse, held by its inventor, Douglas Engelbart, in 1963 – one of the 100 ideas that changed the web. 

explore-blog:

The mouse, with its ability to click on specific parts of a document, was the device that made hypertext possible. Without hypertext, there would be no links, and without links, no web. 

The first computer mouse, held by its inventor, Douglas Engelbart, in 1963 – one of the 100 ideas that changed the web

Video:

What if Godzilla (2014) were a video game? Now you know…

Created by CineFix. Found at Laughing Squid.

Photo:

John, from RetroMacCast, made this 1/3 scale Macintosh computer. Isn’t it cute?

John, from RetroMacCast, made this 1/3 scale Macintosh computer. Isn’t it cute?

(Source: creativebits.org)

Video:

jtotheizzoe:

Why Are Stars Star-Shaped?

Great new video from MinutePhysics that asks why we draw stars as star-shapes, when they’re really just spherical orbs of superheated plasma (and those are much easier to draw, by the way).

We know that stars twinkle because of the distortion caused by our atmosphere miles above your head, but that’s not what gives them their apparent star shape. If that were the case, then why do Hubble images also flare out? Unless J.J. Abrams works for NASA or something…

The actual answer lies in your very own eye. I won’t spoil the rest, but after my video this week (which looked into why goats have such weirdly shaped rectangular pupils), I have to know: What does the ungulate astronomer see?

PS - Which came first, stars… or stars?

Photo:

Andrew Guscott makes custom game controllers! They’re beautiful.

Andrew Guscott makes custom game controllers! They’re beautiful.

(Source: formlabs.com)

Photo:

Joan Truckenbrod: Poesis, 1975

"In my early work, I created a sense of presence of invisible forces in nature. For me, these forces in nature are metaphors for the interpersonal dynamics between people. I created algorithmic images, using mathematical descriptions of phenomena such as light reflecting off of irregular sur-faces, that embodied these dynamic forces. In these drawings, environmental phenomena that we sense, like the wind, were visualized and given a physical presence. Algorithmic patterns were also created on fabric using heat-transfer xerography. This mapping of environmental behaviors onto cloth propelled this algorithmic representation back into the natural world.
I began making digital drawings by programming the computer in FORTRAN programming language. These early drawings were created using an IBM Mainframe computer and a CalComp Plotter. The computer processing was done in Batch mode. My computer programs were processed and the resulting data for the drawings was recorded on a 16 BPI tape. I picked the tape up at the computer center and hand delivered it to the Geography Department at Northern Illinois University, who operated the large Calcomp drum. plotter.”

Find more early computer art…

Joan Truckenbrod: Poesis, 1975

"In my early work, I created a sense of presence of invisible forces in nature. For me, these forces in nature are metaphors for the interpersonal dynamics between people. I created algorithmic images, using mathematical descriptions of phenomena such as light reflecting off of irregular sur-faces, that embodied these dynamic forces. In these drawings, environmental phenomena that we sense, like the wind, were visualized and given a physical presence. Algorithmic patterns were also created on fabric using heat-transfer xerography. This mapping of environmental behaviors onto cloth propelled this algorithmic representation back into the natural world.

I began making digital drawings by programming the computer in FORTRAN programming language. These early drawings were created using an IBM Mainframe computer and a CalComp Plotter. The computer processing was done in Batch mode. My computer programs were processed and the resulting data for the drawings was recorded on a 16 BPI tape. I picked the tape up at the computer center and hand delivered it to the Geography Department at Northern Illinois University, who operated the large Calcomp drum. plotter.”

Find more early computer art…